Keeping your business records secure

Many business owners have a loft/garage/spare bedroom  full of business records.

Business records have to be keep for 6 years. HMRC can levy fines if the records cannot be produced. These records can also get lost, damaged, muddled and key information lost. The link between the figures on the tax return and these  documents may then become unclear.

We have a simple, inexpensive solution to for you.

When we receive your records, we scan them for you. Then, using advanced software and our skills, we produce your accounts together with schedules of items making up the figures and an image of the documents themselves.  This will satisfy even the most demanding HMRC Inspector.

 

We will send you a copy of the file (which will be in PDF format) and show you how to store it in a free Dropbox or GoogleDrive account.

Price for this additional service depends on the volume of records. Prices start at £30 plus VAT.

Our summary of the March 19th, 2015 Budget

Please click on the link below to see a summary of yesterday’s budget.

budget_summary_2015_19_March

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

 

HMRC Tax Investigations Yielding Greater Returns

HMRC has boosted returns from its investment into tax investigations carried out by local compliance teams, which focus on individual taxpayers and small businesses (a new report from The 2020 Group has found). For every £1 spent by local compliance teams in 2013/14, £18 was collected in additional tax. This is up from £16 per £1 invested during the previous year.

In total, £8.9 billion in extra tax was collected via local compliance investigations in 2013/14, up from £7.8 billion in 2012/13.

This high return on investment means that HMRC is likely to continue to pour resources into tax investigations undertaken by these teams. A growing number of ‘everyday’ taxpayers, including more SMEs, are likely to find themselves under scrutiny as a result.

This increased efficiency serves as a reminder that HMRC is broadening its range of targets. HMRC is no longer focusing solely on high net worth individuals with money held offshore or traditional cash businesses. The attempt to increase revenue has led to a greater focus on ordinary taxpayers.

HMRC has launched a range of campaigns in recent years targeting everyday taxpayers. The ‘Second Incomes Campaign’, for instance, means  that private tutors and even online traders are amongst those under more intense scrutiny. Voluntary disclosure schemes have also been launched to target specific job sectors, with solicitors being one of the most recent targets.

The 31st January filing deadline typically triggers a wave of new tax investigations. HMRC’s increased efficiency means that taxpayers should be ever more diligent when completing self-assessment tax returns.

The new aggressive approach adopted by HMRC means it is much more likely that tax-payers may end up on the receiving end of a tax investigation.

Here at TaxAssist Accountants we give peace of mind to clients by offering an insurance policy to pay our fees if a client is selected for enquiry.

30 Ways to Reduce Your Tax Bill

Here is a really useful guide to reducing your tax bill.

Please contact us if you need any further infomation

TaxAssist_30_Ways_14.15_Tax_Year

A neat summary of yesterday’s Autumn Statement relevant to owner-managed businesses

There was a surprising amount of content in yesterday’s Autumn Statement.

This is neatly summarised in a PDF file which can be opened by clicking on the link below.

Autumn Statement December 2014

If you need any further advice, please do not hesitate to contact us.

A thought for landlords to mitigate HMRC’s withdrawal of tax relief on some repairs

We have been having a lot of discussions internally about HMRC’s withdrawal of concession ESC B47. This means that (in an unfurnished rented property), there is no tax deduction available for the replacement of carpets and free standing white goods.

It makes sense, therefore, to  take out an accidental damage insurance policy for these sort of items. The cost of the insurance policy will be tax-deductible.

Other alternatives include – making the tenant responsible for replacements and considering furnishing (to HMRC’s definition) an existing unfurnished property thereby getting the wear and tear allowance.

Please feel free to contact us for further advice.

Am I a Subcontractor?

Question

I run a limited company and deliver electrical services. I recently did some work for another company and they deducted 20% tax! Is that correct? I’ve never had that happen before.

Answer

The Construction Industry Scheme (CIS) is a set of special rules for handling payments for construction work that contractors make to subcontractors. The scheme covers all construction work carried out in the UK, as well as some other related work. If your business is involved with construction operations then it might operate as a contractor or as a subcontractor- or as both.

Under the rules of CIS you’re a subcontractor if you agree to do construction work for a contractor. Subcontractors can be self-employed individuals, any type of business (such as sole traders, partnerships or limited companies), or other bodies and organisations.

It doesn’t matter how you complete the work – you could do it yourself, get your employees to do it, use your own subcontractors or make some other arrangement. And it also doesn’t matter if you don’t normally think of yourself as a subcontractor; you could still be treated as one under CIS.

So unfortunately, your customer (the contractor) may well have been correct to deduct tax from your invoice.

If you’d like to find about more about the Construction Industry Scheme and how it may be possible to receive your payments gross, please do not hesitate to contact us.